Springtime snapping

Rosie and William
Rosie and William

If your camera’s been in hibernation over the winter months, the warmer weather and longer days of spring make this the perfect time to dust it down and get snapping again.

Get on the nature trail
As Mother Nature awakens from her deep slumber, the countryside, parks and the little old back garden begin a remarkable transformation. Spectacular sights abound as daffodils, tulips and crocuses put on a wonderful show that’s begging to be snapped. Thick carpets of bluebells make for a dizzying photographic opportunity, and as we move into the height of the blossoming season, resisting the urge to pick up your camera will be futile!

Try a bee’s-eye view!
Getting close to your subject always pays off if you’re trying to capture the delicate beauty of spring. Select your camera’s macro setting, get up close and you’ll be amazed at the intricate detail and bright colours that petals, buds and leaves will reveal.

Nature on the move
With hungry chicks to feed, the UK’s feathered population is out in force during spring as they look for food. Attract them by putting out scraps of food or a bird feeder in your garden, use zoom so you can keep your distance and choose a quick shutter speed to ensure pin-sharp pictures of those fast-moving flying creatures.

Brighter ideas
Springtime sunshine can play havoc with your photography, so it’s worth remembering some golden rules to ensure you get the best-possible shots. Try to keep the sun behind you and avoid too much contrast in your shots by making sure your subject’s not partially shaded. Late afternoons and early mornings are great times to take photos as the sunshine often offers a subtler, more ‘golden’ quality.

Springtime snapping